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Blood Tests for Cats

Blood tests are used to check many things and are an important diagnostic tool for our veterinarians. A small amount of blood provides us with a wealth of information. Our most common blood test is a “Wellness Profile” which consists of a biochemical analysis that checks liver and kidney function, protein levels, electrolyte balance and a CBC to check the red and white blood cell counts, platelet count and PCV.

Why does my kitty need a blood screen?

If your cat is sick, our veterinarians will recommend a blood screen to check for changes from the normal values which can help in the diagnosis of your cat’s problem. If your cat is healthy, a blood screen allows us to establish the normal values for your cat and then, as your cat ages, we can monitor any changes to those values.

How long does it take to get blood test results?

Our hospital is equipped with an in-house laboratory so we can have the results of the blood tests within 15-20 minutes.

What precautions should I take before a blood test?

Just as with humans, a cat should fast prior to having a blood test. The fasting ensures there will not be any interfering factors (such as fatty blood from a recent meal) when we run the blood tests.

How often should blood tests be done?

Ideally, blood tests should be done once a year. Cats have much shorter lifespans than humans do, and annual blood tests can help pick up problems before the cat is showing symptoms. As the cat ages into the senior years, it is recommended to have blood tests run every six months.

Do you also do urinalysis and biopsy?

Yes, our hospital is equipped to perform urinalysis and biopsies. The urinalysis requires only a small amount of urine and it is a good predictor of illness. A biopsy is only done when there is a medical need for it (such as a mass or skin lesion) so that test is not a part of a routine health screen. However, if the veterinarian has recommended a biopsy for your pet, our hospital is equipped to perform the procedure.

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